2023 YEAR IN REVIEW

A year ago today we were very white with another major storm coming before Christmas. I like this better.

                Spring was wet, started seeding May 4th, finished the corn May 24th, pintos were seeded on time. A very warm nice June – with rain at the end, a very nice start. Stayed dry through mid-August, weed control was better than average because of good plant growth and not many showers.

                Wheat ran about 70 bushels for us, Barley 85, I heard of 100-bushel wheat and 130-bushel barley.  NDSU released a new barley, Treasure, bred as a feed barley, should stand better with higher fertility, and with more even dry down.  I hear malt barley contracts are reduced; wheat acres will be down again.

                Pintos were our best crop, just under 2000 pounds per acre. We only raised slow darks, seems there was a significant yield reduction compared to traditional beans, larger than normal, 15%? Currently, there is a $3-$4 premium for SD. 

                Lots of 50 plus bushel soybeans in the area, good crop, dry beans and soybeans are the only crops with new contract pricing that seems ok.  With the new soybean crushing plants coming on line, soybean basis should be strong.

                Probably my best yielding corn crop ever, about 180 bu/a, Mostly 20 plus moisture, harvest was tiring.  New crop pricing is only 35 cents better than today- it’s going to take a big corn or wheat crop to work next year at these prices.

                Dry beans have had a nice price run because of Mexico’s poor crop. There is a significant carryover, but it appears we will move a lot of it. Next years pricing, as always, will depend on ND and Mexico production, I am hearing pinto acres will stay about the same in this area. We continue to like slow darks, the markets we go to in Mexico and the Dominican Republic like white pintos, quite a bit more expensive for the buyers this year, but color matters in these markets.

                On the seed side there are some slow dark seed choices other than Seed West (ADM). Treasure Valley has a new slow dark Bronco, Kelly Bean Diamondback, and Rodeo (very limited supply) from NDSU, they all seem to be good yielders with good harvestability, with Bronco being a little shorter season.  Vibrant is still about as quick a bean as we have.

Traditional seed, there is a new release from Michigan State, Charro, long season, quicker than Falcon, excellent yield with good harvestability.  We raised it locally so seed cost will be significantly less than western seed.  Western seed increased in prices again this year about $4/unit because “The western grower has so many options that we have to pay extra to get acres”.  Rattler is from Kelly bean and seems ok, Torreon and Cowboy have been good beans in the area.  It is nice to have legitimate choices other than Seed West.

It was nice to finally get a good bean crop, one of the reasons we go through the trouble is, “ we might miss a good one”.  With the added management, there are rewards of, spreading out harvest, very good ground for the fallowing crop, and the joy of harvesting a pretty bean.

Thank you, looking forward to talking,